Category Archives: Tips n Tricks

How much pumpkin should I give my dog?

Pumpkin

Pumpkin for Pets

If you wanted to give the same amounts of fiber to your pet that is found in one high-fiber therapeutic diet, you’d need to feed more than 2 ½ cups of pumpkin per day to a cat and nearly 12 cups per day to a medium-sized dog.

I hear from owners—and vets—all the time that they’ve added pumpkin to a dog or cat’s diet to increase the fiber. Dog and cats don’t require any fiber in their diets. But it can help with issues such as diarrhea, constipation, diabetes, and high fat levels in the blood, as well as to help overweight pets feel full while on a weight-loss diet.

Typically, I see people giving anywhere from ¼ teaspoon to 2 tablespoons of pumpkin at meals to increase a pet’s fiber intake. Unfortunately, this may not help and, in some cases, may cause problems. That’s because if you wanted to give the same amounts of fiber to your pet that is found in one high-fiber therapeutic diet, you’d need to feed more than 2 ½ cups of pumpkin per day to a cat and nearly 12 cups per day to a medium-sized dog!

The minuscule amount and type of fiber in pumpkin usually limit its effectiveness as a fiber source. But pumpkin also can contain ingredients that undermine a pet’s health. While canned pumpkin is only 83 calories per cup, canned pumpkin-pie mix is up to 281 calories per cup due to added sugar, which can pack on the pounds. Too many calories from pumpkin (anything more than 10 percent of total calorie intake) can unbalance your pet’s diet. And canned pumpkin without salt contains only 12 milligrams of sodium per cup, but some canned pumpkin brands with salt contain nearly 600 milligrams of sodium per cup—way too much sodium for a dog or cat with heart or kidney disease.

Finally, by adding a lot of fiber from pumpkin you may accidentally decrease how much protein and other nutrients your pet can absorb from their food, putting them at risk for deficiencies.

So, what’s a better way to add fiber to your dog or cat’s diet? Talk to your veterinarian, who can recommend an appropriate fiber supplement or prescribe a therapeutic diet that contains increased amounts of the specific types of types of fiber—which each have different effects in the gastrointestinal tract and throughout the body—needed to address your pet’s individual needs.

Full credit: Lisa Freeman, J86, V91, N96, head of the veterinary nutrition service at Cummings Veterinary Medical Center
https://now.tufts.edu/articles/people-giving-pets-pumpkin-it-good-them

Caption: If you wanted to give the same amounts of fiber to your pet that is found in one high-fiber therapeutic diet, you’d need to feed more than 2 ½ cups of pumpkin per day to a cat and nearly 12 cups per day to a medium-sized dog.

Dentex

Dental Exercise in Dogs

So, I tried everything I preach at the office. Ajax (my main man) 3/5 black Lab and 1/4 Pit – gets a “treat” every time he comes in from his morning and evening “constitutional”

He’s always loved his Knucklebone.

You need to know that dental exercise has components of tooth scraping, gums toughening, germ killing, slime-stopping, and more. And sadly, NO SINGLE DENTAL EXERCISE MEETS ALL REQUIREMENTS., And some suck worse than others.

But I tried all that other jazz out there – for a month I did Oravet Chews. And another month I did CET chews. I used Greenies in Trudy for MANY years and I have had my dogs on Oxyfresh for a very long time as well.

So I did a chart of what works the BEST. (For my various dogs.)

Dental Exercise In One Page

Pantene

Pantene Conditioner Spray is a Home Made Moisturizing Spray for short coated dogs.

So, you can mix some Pantene Conditioner into a bottle of warm water, and shake it REALLY, REALLY well.. The Pantene doesn’t “mix” with the water, it almost “dissolves” and it takes a minute. Once mixed, it’s easy to “re-mix” and should be, before you spray it on the dog.

There’s a “strength” and a way to use it.

Download the one pager on this, here.

Pantene conditioner spray home made moisturizing spray for short coated dogs.

Zymox Ear Management

Zymox Enzymatic “Cleaner” (Ear Remediation)

Downloadable or online-readable PDF about Zymox and why I am recommending it to you.

Especially after a successful Claro treatment.

Zymox

After Claro treatment there’s four realizations:

  1. Your dog is not like other dogs, for whatever reason, they’re (genetically/breed?) prone to ear infections.
  2. Your dog may have a lifestyle that contributes to ear infections, for example: Swimming. Tiny ear holes. Too much hair.
  3. For a LOT of dogs, ear infections come from #ATOPY and that’s chronic
    1. com/atopy
  4. Your dog’s ear “environment” has just been cannon-balled by strong medication to achieve ‘wellness’ and needs help restoring a proper pH and bacterial balance.

Zymox is scarcely more than an (ear-appropriate) oil-base which lifts excess wax off the walls of the ear canals and restores the proper pH and bacterial colonies which actually belong in the ear.

  • It’s squalene, and that’s water repellent making it awesome for swimmers.
  • Squalene makes the ear canal too slickery to hold onto dark wax.
  • It has enzymes which digest organics, break down wax, and inhibit/outcompete yeast organisms and untoward germs.
  • It has compounds to down-regulate the acidity in the ear.

All you do is just apply a little (like oiling a clock or oil on a whetstone, just a bit) Zymox to both ears on days of the week containing a “T” for example Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. Or of course, any three days a week you can remember.

You don’t have to wipe, rub or anything. Just a few drops to create a slight glisten, and you’re good.